THE HARDER THEY FALL
1956, Sony Repertory, 109 min, USA, Dir: Mark Robson

In this adaptation of Budd Schulberg’s bestseller, Humphrey Bogart (in his last role) plays burned-out sportswriter Eddie Willis, hired by a crooked boxing promoter (Rod Steiger) to tout his circus-freak heavyweight as a legit contender (based on the true story of Primo Carnera). Director Mark Robson crafts a fitting finale to Bogart’s legendary career and lands a few devastating blows to the reputation of the "Sweet Science." Also featuring Jan Sterling, Mike Lane, Max Baer, “Jersey” Joe Walcott and Nehemiah Persoff.


VALLEY OF THE DOLLS
1967, 20th Century Fox, 123 min, USA, Dir: Mark Robson

“You know it's bad to take liquor with those pills,” warns small-town girl turned supermodel Anne (Barbara Parkins) to Broadway diva/train wreck Neely (Patty Duke). Neely's answer: “They work faster.” Based on Jacqueline Susann's runaway best-seller - which practically created a cottage industry in glossy, sex-drenched soap operas on page and screen - director Mark Robson’s bitchy, booze-angst-sex-drugs-fueled cult classic cautions against the perils of show business. The tragically beautiful Sharon Tate was nominated for a Golden Globe for Most Promising Newcomer in her role as B-movie queen Jennifer.


EARTHQUAKE
1974, Universal, 123 min, USA, Dir: Mark Robson

Director Mark Robson (VALLEY OF THE DOLLS) spins a spectacularly entertaining guilty-pleasure yarn of Los Angeles denizens trapped by a high-magnitude earthquake, with Charlton Heston as a construction engineer trying to deal with his boozy, jealous wife, Ava Gardner, whose father (Lorne Greene of TV’s "Bonanza") just happens to be his boss, while walking a tightrope with his mistress, widow Geneviève Bujold. Then the earthquake hits! With Barry Sullivan, Lloyd Nolan and, in a surprising cameo, Walter Matthau.


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