CALL NORTHSIDE 777
1948, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: Henry Hathaway

In the late 1940s, hardhitting action director Hathaway was the pioneer of a new breed of startlingly neo-realistic, noirish crime film. Pictures like HOUSE ON 92nd STREET and KISS OF DEATH helped to cement his reputation as a genre master, and there's no better example of his straight-from-the-headlines style than in this superior suspenser, with James Stewart trying to prove that convicted killer Richard Conte is innocent. With Lee J. Cobb, Helen Walker.


THE DARK CORNER
1946, 20th Century Fox, 99 min, USA, Dir: Henry Hathaway

In this classic private-eye noir, wrongly convicted shamus Bradford Galt (Mark Stevens) is sprung from prison, but bad luck sticks to his gummed shoes: Who’s the mystery man in the white suit and why won’t he leave Galt alone? What’s his connection to the big-money boys on the Upper East Side? Galt’s no Marlowe - without his loyal gal Friday (a spunky and sexy Lucille Ball), he wouldn’t make it out from behind the 8-ball alive. "I’m backed up in a dark corner," he grouses, "and I don’t know who’s hitting me." Co-starring Clifton Webb and William Bendix.


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