TRASH HUMPERS
2009, Drag City, 78 min, Dir: Harmony Korine

A gang of elderly people wander the nighttime back alleys of Nashville, hidden behind grotesque latex masks, causing general chaos until they find the perfect discarded junk to gyrate against. Korine’s attempt to make a project as fast as possible resulted in a damaged, non-aesthetic style shot and edited entirely on VHS. This non-narrative, utterly uncategorizable movie has elements of zombie horror, black comedy, cultural satire and home video. A love letter to a bizarre subculture Korine himself created for the film, TRASH HUMPERS plays like a thrift-store digger’s ultimate found-footage score … if they were hunting through the greatest Goodwill in Hell.


JULIEN DONKEY-BOY
1999, Warner Bros. , 94 min, Dir: Harmony Korine

In writer-director Harmony Korine’s second feature, Ewen Bremner portrays a young man plagued by mental illness. The grueling horrors of his home life don’t help; he suffers under a ruthless tyrant of a father (Werner Herzog in a rare turn in front of the camera) and finds little solace in the sister he may have impregnated (Chloe Sevigny) or his brother, an aspiring wrestler. The first American release to experiment with the Dogme 95 Manifesto’s “Vows of Chastity,” JULIEN DONKEY-BOY wields a unique abstracted aesthetic, shot on MiniDV before being transferred to film.


GUMMO
1997, Warner Bros. , 89 min, Dir: Harmony Korine

With strains of his nihilistic youth-culture script for Larry Clark’s KIDS, Harmony Korine’s directorial debut moves out of the city to wander the post-apocalyptic fallout of a suburban Midwestern landscape recently ravaged by a tornado. Weaving between the day-to-day lives of various poverty-stricken small-town outcasts, GUMMO’s scattershot structure and varied shooting styles present a collage of American themes on the precipice of an unpredictable new millennium, ultimately yielding a movie that Gus Van Sant called “both bracingly realistic and hauntingly dreamlike.”


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