WHAT PRICE HOLLYWOOD?
1932, Warner Bros., 87 min, USA, Dir: George Cukor

Brown Derby waitress and aspiring actress Constance Bennett attracts the attention of alcoholic director Lowell Sherman – her career soars while his falters, in this early version of the story that would be more famously adapted in 1937 and 1954 as A STAR IS BORN. “Bennett gives one of those complete, exquisitely nuanced performances that have made Cukor’s direction so justly celebrated.” – Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times.


THE PHILADELPHIA STORY
1940, Warner Bros., 112 min, USA, Dir: George Cukor

Katherine Hepburn had been declared “box office poison” before this delightful romantic comedy, adapted from the Broadway play in which she’d starred, revived her career. She plays Philadelphia socialite Tracy Lord, who is just about to get married when her ex-husband (Cary Grant) and a reporter (James Stewart) enter the picture. Stewart and screenwriter Donald Ogden Stewart both earned Oscars for this almost unimprovable screwball gem, later remade as the musical HIGH SOCIETY.


HOLIDAY
1938, Sony Repertory, 93 min, USA, Dir: George Cukor

Society girl Katharine Hepburn falls in love with her sister's idiosyncratic fiancé (a pitch-perfect Cary Grant), and the result is the greatest nonconformist comedy ever made. Working with Philip Barry's play as his foundation, director George Cukor considers serious issues about the human condition and what it means to be truly independent, yet does it all with a light, hilarious and charming touch.


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