I CONFESS
1953, Warner Bros., 95 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Montgomery Clift plays a priest who undergoes a crisis of faith when he hears a murderer's confession; as the film progresses, he takes on the man's guilt as his own, both literally (as police wrongly suspect him of the murder) and psychologically. The French critics of the 1950s considered this to be one of Hitchcock's major works, and it remains among his most underrated masterpieces.


FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
1940, IPMA, 120 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

With the advent of World War II looming, action reporter Johnny Jones (Joel McCrea) is assigned the job of European correspondent for his New York newspaper and told to track down the secret treaty made by two unnamed European countries and a famous diplomat, Mr. Van Meer. Of course this assignment proves more treacherous than Johnny bargained for, and a deadly, positively Hitchcockian game of cat-and-mouse ensues. Look for the now-famous umbrella sequence, tracking a killer’s getaway, and the eerily cinematic windmill scene. With Laraine Day and George Sanders.


MARNIE
1964, Universal, 130 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Wealthy Mark Rutland (Sean Connery)’s erotic obsession with thief Marnie (Tippi Hedren) gradually evolves into full-fledged but excessively manipulative love as he tries to "help" her overcome a past trauma.


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