THE IMMORTAL STORY
1968, Janus Films, 60 min, France, Dir: Orson Welles

Director Orson Welles’ first color film - and final narrative feature completed in his lifetime - is based on a short story by one of his favorite writers, Isak Dinesen. Welles plays an aging merchant in 19th-century Macao who recruits a man (Norman Eshley) and a woman (Jeanne Moreau) to re-enact a tale about a sailor paid to impregnate a rich man’s wife. Shot for French television (largely around Welles’ home in Madrid), this infrequently screened gem co-stars Fernando Rey and features music by Erik Satie.


A GRIN WITHOUT A CAT
LE FOND DE L’AIR EST ROUGE
1977, Icarus Films, 180 min, France, Dir: Chris Marker

As brilliant as it is indescribable, GRIN WITHOUT A CAT looks at the rise and fall of the worldwide revolutionary movement, from France in May 1968, to the anti-Vietnam riots in the United States, to the terrible Soviet crushing of the Prague Spring. The French title of the film is untranslatable in English; roughly, it means "Revolution Is in the Air," a metaphor at once wistful and ever-hopeful. Given the current world situation, GRIN WITHOUT A CAT is, now more than ever, an epic event not to be missed. In one of the film’s many high points, Marker dissects the famous Odessa Steps sequence in BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN - a revolutionary landmark that never actually occurred.


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