THE NAKED CITY
1948, Janus Films, 96 min, USA, Dir: Jules Dassin

A landmark crime movie, producer Mark Hellinger's hardboiled tribute to his beloved Big Apple peels away all the stylistic melodramatics of noir to present Hollywood's first true policier. The scrupulously researched script by Malvin Wald and vivid location photography by William Daniels (an Oscar winner) combined to make this one of the most influential Hollywood films of the 1940s. With Barry Fitzgerald, Howard Duff, Don Taylor, Dorothy Hart and a very scary Ted de Corsia.


GRAND HOTEL
1932, Warner Bros., 113 min, USA, Dir: Edmund Goulding

Director Edmund Goulding orchestrates a dazzling parade of iconographic stars and intersecting subplots. Ballerina Greta Garbo, aristocrat John Barrymore, secretary Joan Crawford and cutthroat mogul Wallace Beery are just a few of the legends who make their way through this classic ensemble drama, a film whose influence can be seen in later films by Robert Altman and P.T. Anderson, among many others. Cedric Gibbons’ stunning Art Deco art direction gives the players an opulent setting for their personal melodramas.


FOOLISH WIVES
1922, 142 min, USA, Dir: Erich Von Stroheim

Billed by Universal as the "first million-dollar movie," Erich Von Stroheim's monumental FOOLISH WIVES was the most expensive film to have been made at the time, and one of the most controversial. Von Stroheim, billed as "The Man You Love to Hate," stars as the impostor who calls himself “Count Karamzin” in order to seduce and exploit aristocratic women. Selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress in 2008.


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