MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW
1937, Universal, 91 min, USA, Dir: Leo McCarey

This Depression-era drama stars Victor Moore and Beulah Bondi as an elderly couple who lose their home to foreclosure and hope to move in with one of their five children – none of whom wants them both. Named to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2010, this was director Leo McCarey’s favorite of his films; other famous fans include Orson Welles, Errol Morris and Japanese screenwriter Kōgo Noda, who patterned TOKYO STORY after it.


BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK
1955, Warner Bros., 81 min, USA, Dir: John Sturges

Set in a mythical desert town post-WWII, the film follows one-armed combat veteran Spencer Tracy as he seeks to discover the whereabouts of a Japanese-American comrade. De facto town leader and full-time racist bully Robert Ryan and his thuggish pals, Lee Marvin and Ernest Borgnine, are the stateside fascists in this suspense-filled classic from director John Sturges and screenwriter Millard Kaufman. Co-starring Anne Francis, Walter Brennan, Dean Jagger and John Ericson.


THE BEST OF EVERYTHING
1959, 20th Century Fox, 121 min, USA, Dir: Jean Negulesco

This adaptation of the Rona Jaffe bestseller follows the lives and loves of three young women (Hope Lange, Diane Baker and Suzy Parker) who share a Manhattan apartment and work together at a publishing house under demanding boss Joan Crawford. Beautifully shot by William C. Mellor, this delectable romantic drama brought composer Alfred Newman an Oscar nomination for the title song, and served as partial inspiration for the series “Mad Men.” Costarring Stephen Boyd, Louis Jourdan and future producer Robert Evans.


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