VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS
2017, STX Entertainment, 137 min, France, Dir: Luc Besson

Luc Besson’s visually spectacular new adventure film is based on the groundbreaking comic book series. In the 28th century, Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and Laureline (Cara Delevingne) are special operatives charged with maintaining order throughout the human territories. Under assignment from the Minister of Defense, the two embark on a mission to the astonishing city of Alpha - an ever-expanding metropolis where species from all over the universe have converged over centuries to share knowledge, intelligence and cultures. There is a mystery at the center of Alpha, a dark force that threatens the peaceful existence of the City of a Thousand Planets, and Valerian and Laureline must race to identify the marauding menace and safeguard not just Alpha but the future of the universe. With Clive Owen, Rihanna, Ethan Hawke, Herbie Hancock, Kris Wu and Rutger Hauer.


FEMME FATALE
2002, Warner Bros., 114 min, Dir: Brian de Palma

Jewel thief Laure (Rebecca Romijn) gets more than she bargained for when she tries to double-cross her partners and start a new life in this fast, funny, deliriously sexy thriller. From its classic De Palma opening set piece (an erotically charged heist set against the backdrop of the Cannes Film Festival) to its provocative playfulness with the concept of “reality” and its elegantly constructed network of visual motifs, this is one of the director’s best and most underrated films. Antonio Banderas is terrific as the photographer who alternates between nemesis and love interest over the course of Laure’s adventure.


LOLO
2015, FilmRise, 99 min, France, Dir: Julie Delpy

Don’t expect a traditional rom-com from writer-director Julie Delpy, who stars here as Violette, a Parisian fashion editor who falls for IT engineer Jean-Rene (famed French funnyman Dany Boon) while on holiday. The relationship has a major hurdle to surmount in Violette’s 19-year-old son, Lolo (Vincent Lacoste), who resorts to increasingly underhanded measures to keep his mother’s affections for himself. “Julie Delpy’s most winningly mainstream concoction yet.” - Boyd van Hoeij, The Hollywood Reporter. In French and English with English subtitles.


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