THREE WISE GIRLS
1932, Sony Repertory, 68 min, USA, Dir: William Beaudine

Jean Harlow, Mae Clarke and Marie Prevost are the wise girls of the title in this pre-Code look at life and love in New York City. When small-town soda jerk Cassie (Harlow) arrives in Manhattan, she catches the eye of a wealthy - but married - man (Walter Byron), and her two friends are of differing opinions on whether Cassie should pursue the affair. Robert Riskin provided the dialogue here, and Andy Devine makes a brief but memorable appearance as a chauffeur.


TRUE CONFESSION
1937, Universal, 85 min, USA, Dir: Wesley Ruggles

Director Wesley Ruggles helmed this rarely screened screwball comedy. Pathological liar Carole Lombard tries to boost the career of her scrupulously honest (and thus unsuccessful) lawyer husband (Fred MacMurray) by confessing to a murder so he can defend her. John Barrymore is an egotistical opportunist who tries to blackmail her, with hilarious results. “Lombard is in full command of her daffy talent, dominating a number of long, virtuoso takes. One scene with slow-burning cop Edgar Kennedy is like a master class in comic timing.” – Dan Callahan, Slant Magazine


EASY LIVING
1937, Universal, 88 min, USA, Dir: Mitchell Leisen

Preston Sturges wrote this Depression-era Cinderella story, in which working girl Jean Arthur's fortunes change after she lucks into possession of a rich woman's coat. As those around her assume that what she wears is an indicator of who she is, Arthur climbs the social ladder and eventually falls in love with Ray Milland - the son of the coat's real owner. Sturges' wit is on full display here, given added elegance by Leisen's beautiful direction.


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