THE MIDNIGHT STORY
1957, Universal, 89 min, USA, Dir: Joe Pevney

A San Francisco motorcycle cop (Tony Curtis) becomes obsessed with solving the murder of his mentor, a popular North Beach priest. Not allowed to follow his suspicions, he chucks his badge and becomes an undercover vigilante. The prime suspect, a popular Italian patriarch (Gilbert Roland), ends up loving him like his own son. But is he guilty of murder? The San Francisco locations are accentuated by atmospheric black-and-white Cinemascope.


ALL MY SONS
1948, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Irving Reis

Edward G. Robinson gives one of his most affecting performances as successful businessman Joe Keller, grappling with guilt over having framed his business partner for a crime he committed. When his son (Burt Lancaster) becomes engaged to the convicted man’s daughter, the sins of the past come hurtling back. Reis and writer-producer Chester Erskine - aided by the noir-stained cinematography of Russell Metty - create a powerful (and inexplicably rare) version of Arthur Miller’s Tony Award-winning play.


THE STRANGER
1946, Park Circus/MGM, 95 min, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

Director Orson Welles’ suspenseful study of an escaped Nazi war criminal (played by Welles himself) living in a small Connecticut town, who is pursued by a federal agent (Edward G. Robinson) to a no-holds-barred climax. Loretta Young gives one of her finest screen performances as Welles’ unsuspecting wife. Ironically, this was Welles’ most successful film at the box office.


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