SEA OF LOVE
1989, Universal, 113 min, USA, Dir: Harold Becker

Burned-out New York City detective Frank Keller (Al Pacino) gets the call when a man is found murdered with a 45 of the song “Sea of Love” at his bedside. Among Keller’s few leads is a personals ad that had been placed by the victim; teaming up with another investigator (John Goodman) working a similar case, they place an ad of their own. Among the women it attracts is Helen Cruger (Ellen Barkin), and though she can’t be eliminated as a suspect, Keller begins a relationship with her. There’s terrific chemistry among the leads (Pacino earned a Golden Globe nomination for his performance), and this hit erotic thriller will keep you guessing until the very end.


OPERA
aka TERROR AT THE OPERA
1987, 100 min, Italy, Dir: Dario Argento

One of director Dario Argento’s greatest masterpieces, OPERA is a tour-de-force of deliriously cinematic setpieces surrounding the murderous production of an operatic version of "Macbeth." (The script was inspired by Argento’s attempt to mount "Rigoletto"!) Argento’s camera moves like a thing possessed: swooping, gliding, tracking a bullet through a peephole and, in one mind-bending shot, whirling around the opera house on raven’s wings. When a prominent opera star suffers a non-fatal car accident, her understudy Betty (Cristina Marsillach) must take on the role of Lady Macbeth. Coincidentally, a deranged madman goes on a homicidal rampage. Co-starring Ian Charleson and Daria Nicolodi (DEEP RED). “A violent aria of memory, bad luck, the artistic drive and the horror of the stare. … If you've pinpointed the identity of the film's killer, it's of little consequence - the genius of the film lies not in such details but in Argento's operatic attention to death and the way in which the film's killer forces Betty's gaze.” – Ed Gonzalez, SlantMagazine.com.


Syndicate content