DJANGO UNCHAINED
2012, Swank, 165 min, USA, Dir: Quentin Tarantino

Set in the South two years before the Civil War, DJANGO UNCHAINED stars Jamie Foxx as Django, a slave whose brutal history with his former owners lands him face-to-face with German-born bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz). Schultz is on the trail of the murderous Brittle brothers, and only Django can lead him to his bounty. Schultz acquires Django with a promise to free him upon the capture of the Brittles, and though success leads Schultz to free Django, the two continue to work together. Through it all, Django remains focused on one goal: rescuing the wife (Kerry Washington) he lost to the slave trade – a quest that leads to Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio), the proprietor of the infamous plantation “Candyland.”


INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS
2009, Swank, 153 min, Germany/USA, Dir: Quentin Tarantino

This WWII-set box office hit stars Brad Pitt as Lt. Aldo Raine, who leads the Basterds, a paramilitary squad that terrorizes the Nazis with quick strikes in enemy territory. The fighters team up with a French theater owner and devise a plot to kill Hitler at a screening of a new propaganda film. Christoph Waltz earned a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his turn as duplicitous SS officer Hans Landa. “Quentin Tarantino’s INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS is a big, bold, audacious war movie that will annoy some, startle others and demonstrate once again that he’s the real thing, a director of quixotic delights.” – Roger Ebert.


CITY OF HOPE
1991, Sony Repertory, 129 min, USA, Dir: John Sayles

Director John Sayles demonstrates both his talent for characterization and his insightful approach to social issues with this ambitious ensemble piece. Vincent Spano plays the son of a contractor involved in a bitter property dispute that threatens to tear apart the New Jersey city where he lives, while Joe Morton plays an idealistic city councilman struggling to build a constituency. Their stories extend into the lives of dozens of supporting characters across race and class lines, all of whom are fully developed and painfully real. A thoughtful and moving portrait of early 1990s American life that is unfortunately even more relevant today in its vision of urban corruption and political maneuvering.


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