CREEPSHOW
1982, Warner Bros., 120 min, USA, Dir: George Romero

There hadn’t been a lot of anthology movies when the George Romero/Stephen King collaboration CREEPSHOW, a film inspired by classic EC horror comics, debuted in 1982; in comparison to the sober, big-budget thrills of POLTERGEIST and THE THING, the Romero/King effort was a refreshing blast of B-movie fun, low on budget and ambition but with a surprisingly good cast: Hal Holbrook, E.G. Marshall, Ted Danson, Leslie Nielsen, Ed Harris, Fritz Weaver and Stephen King himself. "The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill," the segment with King (as an incredibly stupid farmer), is probably the most memorable even though it’s a short vignette compared with the others - it’s a deft takeoff of THE BLOB and a riff on those moronic victims in ’50s sci-fi movies who always want to be first in line to check out that strange light coming from over the next rise.


MARTIN
1977, Lionsgate, 95 min, Dir: George A. Romero

This tale of a young man who may or may not be a 100-year-old vampire, seeking redemption for his bloodlust, is both sympathetic and horrific thanks to John Amplas’ performance as the title character. Is he really a vampire or a mentally disturbed killer?


DAWN OF THE DEAD 3-D
2015, 127 min, Dir: George A. Romero

Writer-director George A. Romero ups the ante on his indie landmark NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD with a bigger budget, more gore (courtesy of special effects/makeup artist Tom Savini) and a touch of social commentary. Four people take refuge in a Pennsylvania shopping mall as a mysterious plague turns fresh corpses into flesh-hungry zombies and civilization collapses around them. This is the original, unrated 1979 U.S. theatrically released version of DAWN OF THE DEAD which has been lovingly and meticulously adapted to a 3-D format under the frame-by-frame supervision of DAWN’S original producer, Richard P. Rubinstein. "One of the best horror films ever made." - Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.


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