KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK
1950, Sony Repertory, 79 min, USA, Dir: Earl McAvoy

Evelyn Keyes, in thrall to a truly despicable crook (Charles Korvin), agrees to carry into the States $40,000 worth of jewels smuggled out of Cuba. What she doesn’t know is that she’s contracted the smallpox virus and is spreading it all over Manhattan. What she learns is that her man is cheating on her - with her sister (Lola Albright)! What she wants is revenge! A truly exciting and underappreciated film featuring a compelling performance by Keyes. Featuring Dorothy Malone and Barry Kelley.


ENTER LAUGHING
1967, Sony Repertory, 112 min, USA, Dir: Carl Reiner

Carl Reiner's first feature is an astonishingly assured debut, with a visual polish (thanks largely to veteran cinematographer Joseph Biroc) and a deep sense of personal expression (it was based on Reiner's autobiographical novel of the same name). Reni Santoni plays a young Jewish man who dreams of becoming a comedian during the Depression. Needless to say, his parents think that working in the family drugstore is a safer bet. Even in this early film, Reiner shows his skill at casting secondary roles, with a supporting cast that includes Shelley Winters, Elaine May, Jose Ferrer, Jack Gilford, Janet Margolin and Michael J. Pollard.


ULZANA’S RAID
1972, Universal, 103 min, USA, Dir: Robert Aldrich

When Ulzana (Joaquin Martinez) and a small band of Apaches escape from an Arizona reservation and begin killing settlers, a green cavalry lieutenant (Bruce Davison) is assigned to capture them with the help of a veteran scout (Burt Lancaster). The desert pursuit that ensues is both a tense tactical game and an unflinching look at how ethnic conflicts brutalize both sides. An underrated Western, expertly directed by Robert Aldrich (THE DIRTY DOZEN) from Alan Sharp’s intricate screenplay.


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