FLY-BY-NIGHT
1942, Universal, 74 min, USA, Dir: Robert Siodmak

Don’t miss this little-seen gem, one of the first Hollywood efforts of noir maestro Robert Siodmak. Shifting with Hitchcockian aplomb between suggestive light comedy and thickly shadowed suspense, Siodmak stuffs two features’ worth of stylish set pieces into a sprightly running time, making this as good as wartime B picture as anything produced in the era. Richard Carlson’s and Nancy Kelly’s romance-on-the-run chemistry, laced with witty innuendo (and plenty of Kelly’s fine gams) is reminiscent of Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll in THE 39 STEPS. Great fun, and surprisingly sexy for its time.


APPOINTMENT WITH DANGER
1951, Paramount, 90 min, Dir: Lewis Allen

Taciturn and tight-lipped Alan Ladd stars as a relentless postal investigator who infiltrates the ruthless gang that murdered his co-worker; his only ally is a reluctant nun (Phyllis Calvert) who was the sole witness to the crime. The stellar supporting cast includes Paul Stewart, Jan Sterling and future “Dragnet” partners Jack Webb and Harry Morgan - as a pair of ruthless killers! Filmed on location in Chicago and Gary, Indiana. Don’t miss this ultra-rare 35mm print!


THE LOST WEEKEND
1945, Universal, 101 min, USA, Dir: Billy Wilder

Director Billy Wilder’s experiences working with Raymond Chandler on DOUBLE INDEMNITY reportedly drew him to this hard-hitting portrait of an alcoholic on a downward spiral. Ray Milland stars as New York writer Don Birnam, whose battle with the bottle takes him from bars to pawnshops to a psychiatric ward as he hits rock bottom. Co-starring Jane Wyman and Howard Da Silva, the film won Oscars for Best Picture, Director, Actor and Adapted Screenplay (by Wilder and producer Charles Brackett).


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