MALICE
1993, Warner Bros., 107 min, Canada/USA, Dir: Harold Becker

A love triangle is fueled by an insurance scam in this contemporary thriller set in a New England college town. Associate dean Andy Safian (Bill Pullman) and wife Tracy (Nicole Kidman) could use some extra money to renovate their new home; when hot-shot surgeon Jed Hill (Alec Baldwin) arrives looking for a room to rent, it seems like the perfect solution. But when Tracy needs emergency surgery, it results in a malpractice suit against Hill - who may not be what he seems. The outstanding cast includes Anne Bancroft, George C. Scott, Bebe Neuwirth and Gwyneth Paltrow.


ZELIG
1983, Park Circus/MGM, 79 min, USA, Dir: Woody Allen

Woody Allen directs and stars as 1920s human chameleon Leonard Zelig, whose uncanny ability to mimic others brings him fame and the attentions of psychiatrist Eudora Fletcher (Mia Farrow). This mockumentary makes clever use of contemporary interviews (from such commentators as Susan Sontag and Saul Bellow) and vintage newsreel footage, tweaked to show Zelig interacting with historical figures such as Babe Ruth, Charles Lindbergh and Adolf Hitler. Santo Loquasto’s costume design and Gordon Willis’s cinematography both earned Oscar nominations. “ZELIG is not only pricelessly funny, it's also, on occasion, very moving. It works simultaneously as social history, as a love story, as an examination of several different kinds of film narrative, as satire and as parody.” - Vincent Canby, The New York Times.


BROADWAY DANNY ROSE
1984, Park Circus/MGM, 84 min, USA, Dir: Woody Allen

This affectionate profile of a hapless talent agent is one of Woody Allen’s best films of the 1980s. “Broadway” Danny Rose (Allen) represents clients at the bottom of the entertainment barrel, among them lounge singer Lou Canova (Nick Apollo Forte). But Canova is on the verge of a comeback - as long as Danny can keep the performer’s affair with a gangster’s ex-girlfriend (Mia Farrow, never better) a secret. Gordon Willis’ B&W cinematography lends a nostalgic glow to this comedy, as do cameos from Milton Berle and Howard Cosell.


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