DESTINY
1944, Universal, 65 min, Dir: Julien Duvivier, Reginald Le Borg

Originally intended to be the opening tale of FLESH AND FANTASY, Universal elected to turn this segment into a 65-minute stand-alone feature, its added passages directed by Reginald Le Borg. A pair of robbers (Alan Curtis and Frank Craven) hide out in rural Paradise Valley, where the townsfolk are so pleasant and trusting that the crooks eagerly map out a plan to rob them blind. But a farmer’s daughter (Gloria Jean), who really is blind, has a big surprise in store for one of them.


DRACULA’S DAUGHTER
1936, Universal, 71 min, USA, Dir: Lambert Hillyer

Dracula’s tormented daughter, Countess Marya (Gloria Holden), longs to escape the bloodsucking curse visited on her by her father in this haunting sequel to the Bela Lugosi original. But her efforts to do so prove futile as she stalks young women and attempts to seduce Dr. Van Helsing’s colleague, Dr. Garth (Otto Kruger), away from the realm of the living. A surprisingly effective little chiller with a good cast that also includes Edward Van Sloan, Marguerite Churchill and Irving Pichel.


FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN
1943, Universal, 74 min, France/USA, Dir: Roy William Neill

Cursed to turn into murderous beast with every full moon, Larry Talbot (Lon Chaney Jr.) heads for Frankenstein’s castle, hoping its secrets can bring an end to his misery. Instead, he finds the scientist’s titular creation (Bela Lugosi) encased in ice. Penned by writer Curt Siodmak, this first meeting of the Universal movie monsters includes appearances by horror stalwarts Lionel Atwill, Dwight Frye and Maria Ouspenskaya.


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