ONCE UPON A TIME
1944, Sony Repertory, 89 min, USA, Dir: Alexander Hall

Huckster showman Jerry Flynn (Cary Grant) has to come up with a quick $100,000, or he’ll lose his theater for good. As luck would have it, he stumbles upon a whimsical find that just might be the ticket out of financial woe: a singing, dancing caterpillar that the nation goes wild for. But as reporters and scientists all fight for the inside scoop about this miraculous creature, the turmoil threatens to separate Flynn from his new-found friends, the caterpillar’s ingenuous owner Pinky and the boy’s charming older sister Jeannie.


99 RIVER STREET
1953, Park Circus/MGM, 83 min, Dir: Phil Karlson

An aspiring actress (Evelyn Keyes) gets entangled with a washed-up boxer (John Payne) framed for the murder of his trampy wife (Peggie Castle). They’ve only got a few hours to hunt down the real killer. No director crafted rugged crime dramas bursting with violence better than director Phil Karlson, and this film (set entirely at night) is one of his best. Keyes lights up the screen and former crooner Payne is a convincing noir tough guy. With Brad Dexter, Frank Faylen, Jay Adler and Jack Lambert.


THE CAINE MUTINY
1954, Sony Repertory, 124 min, USA, Dir: Edward Dmytryk

A superb ensemble cast, including Humphrey Bogart, Jose Ferrer, Fred MacMurray and Van Johnson, leads this classic adaptation of Herman Wouk's novel. Bogart is Captain Queeg, a paranoid authoritarian whose men (led by Johnson and MacMurray) stage a mutiny in the last days of WWII. Ferrer is the brilliant military lawyer who takes on the case once the ship returns to port. Lee Marvin is on hand as a crewman and E.G. Marshall is a withering prosecutor at the court-martial.


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