GIRLS ABOUT TOWN
1931, Universal, 80 min, USA, Dir: George Cukor

With a lavish lifestyle untouched by the Depression, Kay Francis and Lilyan Tashman are New York party girls hired to escort businessmen Joel McCrea and Eugene Pallette, respectively. For the first couple, true romance could trump financial concerns - if a not-quite-divorced spouse cooperates. Cukor’s sure hand with the leads, cinematographer Ernest Haller’s nimble camerawork and a witty script by silent comedy star Raymond Griffith help make this pre-Code gem sparkle. With Louise Beavers.


WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE?
1962, Warner Bros., 134 min, USA, Dir: Robert Aldrich

Forget about its reputation as a camp classic; this first-rate study of the most dysfunctional siblings in cinema history is a classic, period. Bette Davis is unforgettable as a washed-up child star who passes the time by torturing her invalid sister Joan Crawford, and Robert Aldrich's direction crosses horror with film noir to create one of the most chilling yet darkly comic masterpieces of all time. With the great, underrated Victor Buono in probably his most memorable role (he was Oscar-nominated as supporting actor, as was Davis, for actress).


DECEPTION
1946, Warner Bros., 115 min, Dir: Irving Rapper

Aspiring pianist Christine Radcliffe (Bette Davis) is reunited with her lover, cellist Karel Novak (Paul Henreid), whom she feared had died in a Nazi concentration camp. Unfortunately, she’s now the mistress of renowned composer Alexander Hollenius (Claude Rains), who is as creative manipulating human emotions as he is conducting an orchestra. Featuring a soaring score by the legendary Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Lovers of classical music will be swept away by the rapturous music; lovers of classic Hollywood will relish the arch tête-a-tête between Bette Davis and, at his vitriolic best, the incomparable Claude Rains.


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