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FREUD
1962, Universal, 140 min, USA, Dir: John Huston

Montgomery Clift delivers his last truly great performance as the father of psychoanalysis in this fascinating biopic, in which his theories coalesce around the treatment of a patient (Susannah York) in late-1880s Vienna. The film’s original screenwriter, philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, left following creative differences; his successors, Charles Kaufman and Wolfgang Reinhardt, earned an Oscar nomination for their script (as did Jerry Goldsmith for his score). Just as noteworthy is the work of cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, who gives the various dream and fantasy sequences their own distinctive look.


JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR
1973, Universal, 108 min, USA, Dir: Norman Jewison

Adapted from Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s landmark rock-opera, and featuring such standout numbers as “I Don’t Know How to Love Him,” “What’s the Buzz?” and “Jesus Christ, Superstar” performed by an extremely talented cast including Ted Neeley as Christ, Yvonne Elliman as Mary Magdalene and Carl Anderson in a standout role as Judas Iscariot.


NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN
1983, Park Circus/MGM, 134 min, UK/USA, Dir: Irvin Kershner

Sean Connery learned not to say “never” when he returned to the screen as James Bond after swearing off the role following DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER. In this second adaptation of Ian Fleming’s Thunderball, the British Secret Service agent must recover a pair of nuclear warheads stolen by SPECTRE operative Maximillian Largo (Klaus Maria Brandauer). Made outside of the franchise’s usual Eon Productions, NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN features some new faces playing familiar characters (Max von Sydow as Blofeld, Edward Fox as M) as well as Kim Basinger and Barbara Carrera as the requisite “Bond girls.”


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