JULIEN DONKEY-BOY
1999, Warner Bros. , 94 min, Dir: Harmony Korine

In writer-director Harmony Korine’s second feature, Ewen Bremner portrays a young man plagued by mental illness. The grueling horrors of his home life don’t help; he suffers under a ruthless tyrant of a father (Werner Herzog in a rare turn in front of the camera) and finds little solace in the sister he may have impregnated (Chloe Sevigny) or his brother, an aspiring wrestler. The first American release to experiment with the Dogme 95 Manifesto’s “Vows of Chastity,” JULIEN DONKEY-BOY wields a unique abstracted aesthetic, shot on MiniDV before being transferred to film.


FIRST THEY KILLED MY FATHER
2017, Netflix, 136 min, Cambodia/USA, Dir: Angelina Jolie

This shattering child’s-eye view of the Cambodian genocide is based on the memoir of survivor Loung Ung, who was 5 years old when Khmer Rouge forces took control of Phnom Penh in 1975. Played by newcomer Sreymoch Sareum, Loung is separated from her parents, brothers and sisters and forced to work harvesting food for the army before she is eventually turned into a child soldier herself. “An engrossing, dynamically shot movie that moves with real fluidity and complexity.” - Ben Kenigsberg, The New York Times.


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