STREETS OF FIRE
1984, Universal, 94 min, USA, Dir: Walter Hill

One of the great guilty pleasures of the 1980s, director Walter Hill’s spectacular, rock & roll-fueled pulp classic roars at you like a souped-up roadster with the radio going full blast. B-movie god Michael Paré stars as an enigmatic loner who comes back to town to save former gal-pal Diane Lane from the clutches of sinister biker chieftain Willem Dafoe (sporting one of the wickedest hair-dos known to mankind.) Outtasight, baby!


DOG EAT DOG
2016, RLJ Entertainment, 95 min, Dir: Paul Schrader

With two strikes against them, Mad Dog (Willem Dafoe), Troy (Nicolas Cage) and Diesel (Christopher Matthew Cook) don’t have a lot of options. So the three ex-cons are receptive when mobster Grecco the Greek (director Schrader) approaches them with a kidnapping scheme … but the potentially lucrative operation quickly spirals out of control. Adapting Edward Bunker’s seminal pulp underground classic, Schrader employs a gonzo, guerrilla approach to create this brilliantly funny, scattershot noir, which takes us to the underbelly of California with endless bloodbaths, morally corrupt characters and a sadistic sense of fun. “A thoroughly disreputable, sordid and engaging crime drama.” - Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter.


THE ENGLISH PATIENT
1996, Park Circus/Miramax, 162 min, USA, Dir: Anthony Minghella

Ralph Fiennes is badly burned in a WWII plane crash and wakes up in a monastery, where he claims to have no memory of who he is. As nurse Juliette Binoche tends to him, his story emerges in flashbacks, and his passionate affair with Kristin Scott Thomas forms the basis of one of the most beloved romances in movie history. Gabriel Yared’s Oscar-winning score anchors a richly layered, novelistic epic that recalls the best films of David Lean and David O. Selznick.


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