MY DINNER WITH ANDRÉ
1981, Janus Films, 110 min, USA, Dir: Louis Malle

In this captivating and philosophical film, actor and playwright Wallace Shawn sits down with theater director friend André Gregory at a restaurant on New York’s Upper West Side, and the pair proceed through an alternately whimsical and despairing confessional about love, death, money and all the superstition in between. Playing variations on their own New York–honed personas, Shawn and Gregory, who also cowrote the screenplay, dive in with introspective intellectual gusto, and Malle captures it all with a delicate, artful detachment. A fascinating freeze-frame of cosmopolitan culture, MY DINNER WITH ANDRÉ remains a unique work in cinema history.


RADIO DAYS
1987, Park Circus, 88 min, USA, Dir: Woody Allen

Woody Allen recreates the golden age of radio in this charming piece of witty nostalgia. Stories about the great entertainers of the 1940s alternate with episodes of Queens family life in a tapestry of romance and comedy that stars Allen regulars Mia Farrow, Dianne Wiest, Wallace Shawn, Jeff Daniels and Diane Keaton.


CLUELESS
1995, Paramount, 97 min, USA, Dir: Amy Heckerling

Writer-director Amy Heckerling’s sleeper hit plucks the privileged protagonist from Jane Austen’s 19th century novel Emma and plants her in a Beverly Hills high school of today. Rich, beautiful and popular, Cher (Alicia Silverstone in a star-making performance) is used to getting what she wants. When she gets a bad grade, she just plays matchmaker to her teacher, his grading standards relax, and the problem is solved. But when Cher teams with her BFF (Stacey Dash) to work similar magic with the tragically unhip new girl (Brittany Murphy), the effort backfires. Repairing relationships (and power-shopping) to get back on top of the social ladder, Cher winds up with a boyfriend of her own in this effervescent teen comedy. With Paul Rudd.


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