PSYCHO
1960, Universal, 109 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Coming off the comparatively big-budget NORTH BY NORTHWEST, director Alfred Hitchcock decided he wanted to make a nice little, low-budget, black-and-white film for a change of pace. This was the result, and the shock waves are still reverberating. Lovely embezzler Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) takes refuge from a rainstorm off the beaten track on a lonely California highway. Unfortunately, she checks in at the Bates Motel, presided over by young Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), a strange fellow living with his mother in a nearby mansion. Hitchcock used the small crew from his popular TV show for this hair-raising example of California Gothic, and it remains one of the most influential chillers ever made. With Vera Miles and John Gavin.


THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE
1962, Paramount, 119 min, Dir: John Ford

James Stewart and John Wayne represent opposing but equally necessary forces in John Ford’s great late Western: Stewart is an unassuming lawyer who rises to political prominence as he civilizes the West, while Wayne is the man of violent action rendered obsolete by the passage of time. Vera Miles co-stars as the woman both men love, with additional support from Lee Marvin, Lee Van Cleef, Woody Strode and John Carradine.


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