HORROR NOIRE: A HISTORY OF BLACK HORROR
2019, Shudder, 83 min, USA, Dir: Xavier Burgin

Based on the acclaimed book by Dr. Robin R. Means Coleman, Shudder TV’s first original documentary feature takes a critical look at a century of genre films that by turns utilized, caricatured, exploited, sidelined and embraced both black filmmakers and black audiences. Beginning with the silent film era, HORROR NOIRE explores the often overlooked and downplayed history of black Americans in Hollywood: the emergence of black leading men in genre cinema in the late 1960s with NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD and into the ‘70s with BLACULA and films of the blaxploitation era; CANDYMAN and the growing popularity of urban horror in the 1990s; up to the genre’s recent resurgence with movies like the Oscar-winning, critical and commercial hit GET OUT. Clips and in-depth interviews with filmmakers and scholars showcase a who’s who of black horror cinema and underline the power of representation and how horror can become a visceral way to fight racial trauma.


THE MAN FROM EARTH
2007, 87 min, USA, Dir: Richard Schenkman

After history professor John Oldman (David Lee Smith) unexpectedly resigns from his university, startled colleagues impulsively invite themselves to his home, pressing him for an explanation. They’re shocked to hear his reason for premature retirement: John claims he is immortal, and cannot stay in one place for more than 10 years without his secret being discovered. Tempers rise as John's fellow professors attempt to poke holes in his story, and what started out as a friendly gathering soon builds to an unexpected and shattering climax.


CANDYMAN
1992, Sony Repertory, 99 min, USA, Dir: Bernard Rose

Perhaps the greatest horror film of the ’90s is this cerebral and chilling classic by director Bernard Rose, based on Clive Barker's short story “The Forbidden.” Virginia Madsen plays a grad student researching urban legends when she comes across the tale of Candyman, a frightening one-armed man who appears when you say his name into a mirror five times; he’s played brilliantly by Tony Todd. Score by Philip Glass.


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