THE DEAD ZONE
1983, Paramount, 103 min, USA, Dir: David Cronenberg

Director David Cronenberg helms one of the best Stephen King adaptations with Christopher Walken as a young man who receives the gift (or is it curse?) of second sight after a near death accident. Radical upheaval plagues his life as his marriage to Brooke Adams is thwarted, and he becomes involved in helping Sheriff Tom Skerritt track a serial killer. But foreseeing the apocalyptic behavior of power-drunk presidential candidate Martin Sheen provides him with his most tortuous challenge. One of Walken's most poignant, sensitive portrayals.


MASH
1970, 20th Century Fox, 116 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Director Robert Altman’s breakout film defines black comedy and the pushing-the-envelope, pioneering spirit then blossoming in the New Hollywood of the 1970s. Donald Sutherland and Elliott Gould are hilarious as Hawkeye Pierce and Trapper John, newly arrived surgeons at the 4077th MASH unit located in a Korean War battle zone. They’re anarchic spirits with no patience for hypocrisy, bureaucracy or stupidity. Timeless, with a dream cast of standout performers, including Robert Duvall, Sally Kellerman and Tom Skerritt.


ALIEN
1979, 20th Century Fox, 117 min, USA, Dir: Ridley Scott

From its cool, sinister textures to its stomach-churning special effects, director Ridley Scott’s ALIEN reinvented the monster-from-space movie as something mesmerizing, inescapable and strangely beautiful. It also introduced the American action heroine, in Sigourney Weaver’s tough-as-nails Ripley, and the H.R. Giger-designed Alien.


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