HIGH NOON
1952, Paramount, 85 min, USA, Dir: Fred Zinnemann

No movie hero ever walked taller than Gary Cooper in HIGH NOON. As Marshal Will Kane, he’s ready to turn in his badge and settle down with his new wife (Grace Kelly) until he learns a criminal is arriving on the noon train bent on revenge. When the locals turn a deaf ear to Kane’s pleas for help (even deputy Lloyd Bridges refuses), the lawman must face a gang of killers alone. This iconic Western, named by the AFI as one of the 100 greatest films of all time, won four Oscars, including a Best Actor award for Cooper and Best Song for “Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin’.” With Katy Jurado. Favorite film of former president Bill Clinton, who screened it a record 17 times at the White House.


THEODORA GOES WILD
1936, Sony Repertory, 94 min, USA, Dir: Richard Boleslawski

Irene Dunne’s first big comedy role casts her as a small-town gal with a dark secret: She writes racy best-sellers! When enamored publisher Melvyn Douglas figures it out, he shows up on her doorstep and threatens to, uh, expose her if she doesn’t give him a tumble! With Thomas Mitchell, Thurston Hall and Spring Byington, based on a story by Mary McCarthy (Kevin’s sister).


THE DARK MIRROR
1948, Universal, 85 min, USA, Dir: Robert Siodmak

“When he called her ‘killer’… and took her twin in his arms… Did he know which was which?” Witnesses place Ruth Collins (Olivia de Havilland) at the scene of a grisly murder. When it’s discovered she has a twin, Dr. Elliot (Lew Ayres) is brought in to psychologically evaluate them both. When the doc falls for one of them, the other becomes murderously jealous. Noir master Robert Siodmak deftly directs this Oscar-nominated original story, guiding the great de Havilland through two sensational performances, as the sisters both sweet and sinister. Preservation by UCLA Film & Television Archive, funded by The Film Foundation. Not on DVD!


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