TOM JONES
1963, Janus Films, 128 min, Dir: Tony Richardson

At the height of the British New Wave in the early 1960s, director Tony Richardson and playwright John Osborne set out for more fanciful territory than the gritty realism of the movement they’d helped establish. TOM JONES brings a theatrical flair to Henry Fielding’s canonical 18th-century novel, boisterously chronicling the misadventures of the foundling of the title (Albert Finney, in a career-defining performance), whose easy charm seems to lead him astray at every turn from his beloved, the well-born Sophie Western (Susannah York). This spirited picaresque, evocatively shot in England’s rambling countryside and featuring an extraordinary ensemble cast, went on to become a worldwide sensation, winning the Oscar for best picture on the way to securing its status as a classic of irreverent wit and playful cinematic expression.


FREUD
1962, Universal, 140 min, USA, Dir: John Huston

Montgomery Clift delivers his last truly great performance as the father of psychoanalysis in this fascinating biopic, in which his theories coalesce around the treatment of a patient (Susannah York) in late-1880s Vienna. The film’s original screenwriter, philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, left following creative differences; his successors, Charles Kaufman and Wolfgang Reinhardt, earned an Oscar nomination for their script (as did Jerry Goldsmith for his score). Just as noteworthy is the work of cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, who gives the various dream and fantasy sequences their own distinctive look.


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