BABY, THE RAIN MUST FALL
1965, Sony Repertory, 100 min, USA, Dir: Robert Mulligan

The TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD team of director Robert Mulligan, producer Alan Pakula and writer Horton Foote reunite for this underrated drama set in rural Texas. In a role that plays as if it hit close to home, Steve McQueen is a troubled singer (whose band includes Glen Campbell) recently released from prison. If only for their daughter’s sake, wife Lee Remick hopes to keep him on the straight and narrow - but deputy sheriff Don Murray is there just in case she can’t.


THE SAND PEBBLES
1966, 20th Century Fox, 182 min, USA, Dir: Robert Wise

This sweeping tale of gunboat diplomacy in 1920s China was a longtime passion project for director Robert Wise, who shot THE SOUND OF MUSIC during the film’s pre-production delays. In his only Oscar-nominated performance, Steve McQueen plays Jake Holman, a Navy machinist's mate plunged into simmering racial and political tensions when he is transferred to the U.S.S. San Pablo. The star-studded cast includes Richard Attenborough, Richard Crenna, Candice Bergen and Mako.


THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
1960, Park Circus/MGM, 128 min, USA, Dir: John Sturges

Excellent, Americanized version of the Akira Kurosawa classic THE SEVEN SAMURAI, helmed by noted action auteur John Sturges (THE GREAT ESCAPE, BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK), with charismatic Steve McQueen making his first star turn alongside Yul Brynner, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and Horst Buchholz as gunmen hired to safeguard a Mexican farm village from marauding bandit chieftain Eli Wallach. With an instantly memorable Elmer Bernstein score, which inspired everything from future Westerns to cigarette commercials (!) for decades to come.


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