HIGHLANDER
1986, 20th Century Fox, 116 min, UK, USA, Dir: Russell Mulcahy

In 16th-century Scotland, Connor MacLeod (Christopher Lambert) appears to be mortally wounded in a fight but survives. The arrival of a stranger (Sean Connery) reveals the truth: Connor is one of a select group of Immortals who can only be killed by decapitation and who are destined to battle each other for supreme power. Through the centuries they have lived secret lives, stalking each other until one final confrontation in present-day New York City. A sword-and-sorcery tale for the MTV generation, HIGHLANDER has achieved its own immortality, inspiring several sequels and a television series.


INFINITE SPACE: THE ARCHITECTURE OF JOHN LAUTNER
2008, 90 min, USA, Dir: Murray Grigor

The lifelong quest of visionary genius John Lautner to create “architecture that has no beginning and no end” is traced in this fascinating documentary telling the story of his brilliant and complicated life - and the most sensual architecture of the 20th century. As a young man, Lautner broke from his mentor, Frank Lloyd Wright, and went west to California to forge his own architecture. His life was marked by innovation and inspiration, endless battles with building codes, an accidental leap into the epicenter of pop culture, bitterness at lost opportunities and finally, monumental achievement.


DR. NO
1962, MGM/Park Circus, 111 min, UK, Dir: Terence Young

Now almost taken for granted, this initial adaptation of Ian Fleming’s spy novels was a subversive breath of fresh air, depicting for the first time a secret agent who was an unapologetically suave, promiscuous - not to mention homicidal hero. Sean Connery proved amazingly popular as the ultimate sexy beast, James Bond, ushering in the entire 1960s spy-film craze. One of the best of the Bond films, with its Caribbean locale, Ursula Andress’ sensual presence as the feral nature girl and Joseph Wiseman as the evil mastermind with black metal hands.


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