NIGHTHAWKS
1981, Universal, 99 min, Dir: Bruce Malmuth

In this inventive action-thriller, Sylvester Stallone and Billy Dee Williams star as New York City cops tasked with bringing down an international terrorist played by the inimitable Rutger Hauer. “Nighthawks is an exciting cops and killers yarn with Sylvester Stallone to root for and cold-blooded Rutger Hauer to hate.” – Variety, 1980.


THE HITCHER
1986, 97 min, Dir: Robert Harmon

A pulse-pounding thriller completely misunderstood by critics at the time, THE HITCHER stars an ultra-frightening Rutger Hauer as the iconic killer John Ryder .While on a road trip across the Midwest, young Jim Halsey (played by C. Thomas Howell) makes the deadly mistake of picking up the deranged hitchhiker, who takes great pleasure in setting up a high stakes game of cat-and-mouse. With a trail of bodies in their wake, the two become increasingly inseparable, much to Jim’s horror. Featuring Jennifer Jason Leigh and Jeffrey DeMunn.


FLESH+BLOOD
1985, Park Circus/MGM, 126 min, Dir: Paul Verhoeven

It’s 1501, and the world is full of mercenaries, peasants and pestilence. True to its title, Paul Verhoeven presents the darkest of ages, a brutally realistic story of the struggle for life, complete with rape, murder, starvation and the Black Death. Rutger Hauer, in one of his finest roles, portrays the leader of a band of mercenaries, who seeks revenge for a nobleman’s (the excellent Jack Thompson) betrayal by kidnapping and brutalizing his son's (Tom Burlinson) bride to be. Jennifer Jason Leigh shines as the strong willed Agnes. Based in part on unused material for the Dutch TV series "Floris," which Gerard Soeteman, Paul Verhoeven and Rutger Hauer collaborated on in 1969. Watch for the amazing performance by Susan Tyrell as an onlooker to one of the films most brutal and controversial scenes. The late Basil Poledouris contributes perhaps his best score. Although Verhoeven later denied any connection, some critics at the time of release pointed out allegorical similarities to Patty Hearst’s abduction by the SLA.


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