THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
1960, Park Circus/MGM, 128 min, USA, Dir: John Sturges

Excellent, Americanized version of the Akira Kurosawa classic THE SEVEN SAMURAI, helmed by noted action auteur John Sturges (THE GREAT ESCAPE, BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK), with charismatic Steve McQueen making his first star turn alongside Yul Brynner, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and Horst Buchholz as gunmen hired to safeguard a Mexican farm village from marauding bandit chieftain Eli Wallach. With an instantly memorable Elmer Bernstein score, which inspired everything from future Westerns to cigarette commercials (!) for decades to come.


GOOD LUCK, MISS WYCKOFF
1979, Vinegar Syndrome, 105 min, USA, Dir: Marvin J. Chomsky

Legendary production designer Polly Platt (THE LAST PICTURE SHOW, TERMS OF ENDEARMENT) wrote the screenplay for this adaptation of William Inge’s novel about a high school Latin teacher (Anne Heywood), whose life is upended by an abusive affair with a black student (John Lafayette). A searing tale examining race and sex in 1950s America, the film costars Donald Pleasance, Robert Vaughn, and Ronee Blakeley.


S.O.B.
1981, Warner Bros., 122 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

When director Richard Mulligan's expensive musical turns out to be a flop, he decides to recut it as an erotic epic that will exploit the squeaky-clean image of star Julie Andrews. This hilarious and trenchant satire has echoes of Edwards' own experiences making DARLING LILI, but its comedy reaches beyond mere score-settling to present a mercilessly funny - and at times surprisingly sweet - poison-pen love letter to the American cinema. The great supporting cast includes William Holden, Robert Webber, Robert Vaughn, Larry Hagman (J.R. of "Dallas") and a very young Rosanna Arquette.


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