CHICAGO
2002, Park Circus/Miramax, 113 min, USA/Germany/Canada, Dir: Rob Marshall

At a time when crimes of passion result in celebrity headlines, nightclub sensation Velma Kelly (Catherine Zeta-Jones) and spotlight-seeking Roxie Hart (Renée Zellweger) both find themselves sharing space on Chicago's famed Murderess Row. They also share Billy Flynn (Richard Gere), the town's slickest lawyer with a talent for turning notorious defendants into local legends. But in Chicago, there's only room for one legend! Based on the Bob Fosse stage musical, the film won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, with supporting performances by John C. Reilly (as Hart’s gullible husband) and Queen Latifah (as a corrupt jail matron) garnering additional Oscar nominations.


AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN
1982, Paramount, 124 min, USA, Dir: Taylor Hackford

Designated by the AFI as one of the greatest love stories in the history of American cinema, this six-time Oscar-nominated romantic powerhouse follows the journey of a young naval student (Richard Gere) as he struggles to balance the rigors of flight training with a developing attraction to a young factory worker (Debra Winger). “AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN takes chances, takes the time to know and develop its characters, and by the time this movie's wonderful last scene comes along, we know exactly what's happening, and why, and it makes us very happy.” - Roger Ebert


ARBITRAGE
2012, Roadside Attractions, 107 min, USA, Dir: Nicholas Jarecki

Billionaire hedge-fund manager Robert Miller (Richard Gere) is caught making illegal deals by a business partner and has just days to balance his books to avoid jail time. In addition, Miller is in the midst of a cat-and-mouse game with a detective (Tim Roth) investigating him for covering up the accidental killing of his mistress. ARBITRAGE is both a tense, edge-of your-seat thriller (think Bernie Madoff meets MATCH POINT) and a complex character study expertly executed by Gere.“Mr. Gere is one of cinema's great walkers, graced with a suggestively predatory physical suppleness, and he slips through the movie like a panther. He's the film's most deluxe item.” - Manohla Dargis, New York Times.


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