THE VALLEY OF GWANGI
1969, Warner Bros., 96 min, USA, Dir: James O’Connolly

One of Ray Harryhausen’s most rarely screened gems, GWANGI stars James Franciscus as a brash young cowboy who stumbles across a hidden valley teaming with prehistoric life. Trouble ensues when Franciscus captures one of the lost dinosaurs and tries to exhibit it in a traveling circus. Co-starring Richard Carlson, Gila Golan, Laurence Naismith.


TRY AND GET ME
1951, Film Noir Foundation, 91 min, USA, Dir: Cy Endfield

The true story of a shocking 1934 kidnapping and murder in San Jose provided the inspiration for one of the most compelling—and unjustly neglected—masterpieces of film noir. Ex-GI Howard Tyler (Frank Lovejoy), struggling to support his family, meets flashy hoodlum Jerry Slocum (Lloyd Bridges), who eases the gullible Howard into a lucrative life of crime. Their escapade turns dark and desperate when Jerry takes hostage the son of a wealthy local businessman. One of the last films made in the U.S. by blacklisted writer/director Cy Endfield before he relocated to England, TRY AND GET ME (originally released as THE SOUND OF FURY) has been restored by the Film Noir Foundation so that it may be experienced in its original form by future generations and assume its rightful status as one of the great films of its era. NOT ON DVD!


CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON
1954, Universal, 79 min, USA, Dir: Jack Arnold

Ichthyologist Dr. David Reed (Richard Carlson) leads a team of scientists on an expedition up the Amazon River to hunt for fossils linking prehistoric land and sea mammals. But the murky waters of the region’s Black Lagoon hide more than old bones; an amphibious gill-man rises from the depths to attack the researchers. Like King Kong, the creature is captured, escapes and sets his sights on a beautiful woman - Dr. Reed’s girlfriend, Kay (Julia Adams). The last of the classic Universal movie monsters, CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON was one of the studio’s first 3-D features, and remains among the most memorable horror films of the 1950s.


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