THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI
1948, Sony Repertory, 87 min, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

The camera is the star in one of director Orson Welles’ most phantasmagorical films, a dazzling noir thriller about a seaman, a crippled lawyer and his homicidal wife pursuing one another through a "bright, guilty world" of infidelity, deception and murder. The hall-of-mirrors climax is riveting. With Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth and Everett Sloane. Edited by Viola Lawrence.


THE THIRD MAN
1949, Rialto Pictures, 93 min, UK, Dir: Carol Reed

Director Carol Reed was nominated for a Best Director Oscar and Robert Krasker won for Best Cinematography for this superlative thriller about post-WWII criminal intrigue in still-ravaged, bureaucratically compromised Vienna. Orson Welles excels in perhaps his most famous role as homicidal rogue Harry Lime. In fact, Lime is so charming that his estranged paramour (Alida Valli) remains loyal to him and his old best friend (Joseph Cotten) cannot bring himself to believe the awful truth. With a story and screenplay by Graham Greene (who later adapted it into a novel).


CITIZEN KANE
1941, Warner Bros., 119 min, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

Orson Welles was only 25 when he directed this masterpiece, and it remains one of the most phenomenal motion pictures ever made. Welles also stars as Charles Foster Kane, a ruthless man who built a newspaper publishing empire and a character supposedly modeled after the real-life William Randolph Hearst. Trailblazing in so many respects, from Gregg Toland’s complex camera and lighting to Bernard Herrmann’s score to one of the finest ensemble casts (including Joseph Cotten, Everett Sloane and Agnes Moorehead) ever assembled. With an Academy Award-winning script by Welles and Herman J. Mankiewicz.


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