THE ADVENTURES OF BARON MUNCHAUSEN
1988, Sony Repertory, 126 min, UK, Dir: Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam's third fantasy film (following TIME BANDITS and BRAZIL) is yet another terrific children's film that is just as entertaining (if not more so) for adults. The mythical Baron Munchausen (John Neville) materializes after a heinous performance of his life story and sets off with pint-sized gamine Sally (Sarah Polley) to save a city in trouble, stopping off along the way for encounters with Oliver Reed, Eric Idle, Jonathan Pryce, Uma Thurman and Robin Williams as the Moon King. "The worlds Gilliam has created here are like the ones he created in his animations for Monty Python - they have a majestic peculiarity. And you're constantly amazed by the freshness and eccentricity of what is pushed in front of your eyes." -Hal Hinson, Washington Post.


THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF
1961, Universal, 93 min, UK, Dir: Terence Fisher

Director Terence Fisher’s atmospheric thriller not only has the distinction of being not only Oliver Reed’s first leading role but also Hammer Studios’ only werewolf film. And a chillingly fine werewolf film it is, with cursed Reed the offspring born on Christmas Day to a mute servant girl (Yvonne Romain) raped by a bestial beggar (Richard Wordsworth) in the dungeons of the sadistic Marques Siniestro (deliciously depraved Anthony Dawson). Kindly Don Alfredo (Clifford Evans) raises Reed in a good home, but when the sensitive young man reaches puberty and his desires are thwarted, the result is a frenzy of bloody carnage.


THE JOKERS
1967, Universal, 94 min, UK, Dir: Michael Winner

Director Michael Winner’s dazzling (but rarely screened) satire of Young London features Michael Crawford (pre-“Phantom of the Opera”) and Oliver Reed as a pair of rich, freewheeling brothers making the rounds of posh parties. Their anarchic spirit gets the better of them - and a string of increasingly elaborate pranks results in their making off with the Crown.


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