AN AMERICAN RHAPSODY
2001, Paramount, 106 min, Dir: Éva Gárdos

Nastassja Kinski, Scarlett Johansson and Tony Goldwyn star in this drama inspired by the true story of director Éva Gárdos' own life. Persecuted by an oppressive Communist government, a Hungarian couple makes a daring fight for freedom. The escape is successful, but comes at an unthinkable price - the couple's baby, Suzanne, is left behind in Hungary. Six years later, the girl is uprooted from the only parents that she knows and reunited with her biological parents in California. But as she grows, so do the questions about her mysterious past and heritage. Feeling lost and alienated, the rebellious teenage Suzanne (Johansson) returns to Hungary, embarking on a personal search for the true meaning of family, freedom and home.


CAT PEOPLE (1982)
1982, Universal, 118 min, USA, Dir: Paul Schrader

Director Paul Schrader adds a glossy ’80s eroticism to Jacques Tourneur’s ’40s horror classic about a race of people who turn into cats when sexually aroused. Nastassja Kinski travels to New Orleans to visit long-separated brother Malcolm McDowell, who goes missing right around the time a black panther attacks a prostitute. Giorgio Moroder’s synth-pop score includes the David Bowie hit “Cat People (Putting Out Fire).”


TESS
1979, Janus Films, 186 min, France, UK, Dir: Roman Polanski

Dedicated to his late wife, director Roman Polanski’s adaptation of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles is both luminous and tinted with sorrow. Nastassja Kinski stars in the title role as a Victorian-era farm girl, tragically caught between a lustful aristocrat (Leigh Lawson) and the man who really loves her (Peter Firth). Nominated for six Academy Awards, the film won Oscars for Best Art Direction, Costume Design and Cinematography.


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