A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE
1951, Warner Bros., 122 min, USA, Dir: Elia Kazan

Director Elia Kazan’s powerful adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ classic play made Marlon Brando a household name for his incendiary portrayal of working-class Stanley Kowalski, who collides headlong with fragile Southern belle Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh) when she moves in with Stanley and wife Stella (Kim Hunter), her sister. Brilliantly acted and mounted on every level, with Academy Awards going to Leigh for Best Actress, Hunter for Best Supporting Actress and Karl Malden for Best Supporting Actor. "A masterwork in some indefinable middle ground which is neither stage nor screen." - David Shipman


THE APPALOOSA
1966, Universal, 98 min, USA, Dir: Sidney J. Furie

Marlon Brando stars as Matt Fletcher, a Mexican-American buffalo hunter at odds with ominous local bandit general Chuy Medina (John Saxon). It’s the last straw for Matt when Chuy steals his appaloosa horse, and he sets out for revenge - even if it means singlehandedly taking on all of Chuy’s ruthless gang in the process. Saxon received a Golden Globe nomination for his supporting turn.


ON THE WATERFRONT
1954, Sony Repertory, 108 min, USA, Dir: Elia Kazan

Director Elia Kazan’s stunning adaptation of Budd Schulberg’s account of Hoboken dock-worker life stars Marlon Brando as a has-been fighter who falls in love with the sister (Eva Marie Saint) of the "stool pigeon" he set up. Rod Steiger delivers a wrenching performance as the older brother who helped betray Brando’s chances as a boxer, and Karl Malden is the tough, working-class priest who serves as Brando’s conscience. Featuring Lee J. Cobb in an Oscar nominated performance as Johnny Friendly.


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