GUYS AND DOLLS
1955, Park Circus/MGM, 150 min, USA, Dir: Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Frank Loesser’s Broadway hit, inspired by Damon Runyon’s tales of Times Square hoods and gamblers, becomes one of the 1950s’ most enjoyable musicals in the hands of director Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Needing $1,000 to rent space for his floating crap game, Nathan Detroit (Frank Sinatra) bets Sky Masterson (Marlon Brando, in his only song-and-dance role) that he can find a girl immune to Masterson’s charms – specifically a strait-laced missionary (a wonderful Jean Simmons). “Luck Be a Lady” is just one of the great songs here.


A DRY WHITE SEASON
1990, Park Circus/MGM, 97 min, USA, Dir: Euzhan Palcy

In this blistering drama, Donald Sutherland plays Ben du Toit, a schoolteacher in South Africa, whose eyes are opened to the brutality of apartheid when a black acquaintance is murdered by the police. To bring those responsible to justice, du Toit enlists a human rights attorney (Oscar-nominated Marlon Brando, who emerged from a near-decade retirement to take the role). With Susan Sarandon.


THE UGLY AMERICAN
1963, Universal, 120 min, USA, Dir: George Englund

John F. Kennedy was sufficiently impressed with the foreign policy insights of The Ugly American that he sent copies of the book to all his Senate colleagues; director George Englund and screenwriter Stewart Stern give the bestseller a potent adaptation. Marlon Brando stars as a U.S. ambassador to the fictional Southeast Asian country of Sarkhan, where the limitations of America’s anti-Communist crusade offer eerie parallels to that of Vietnam.


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