IF ...
1968, Paramount, 111 min, UK, Dir: Lindsay Anderson

More than any other film of the era, IF... perfectly represents the international spirit of youthful rebellion in the late ’60s, establishing a balance between broader, pop culture movies like WILD IN THE STREETS and Jean-Luc Godard's apocalyptic WEEKEND. Boarding school student Travis (Malcolm McDowell) is one of the great screen outsiders, a poetic rebel individualist and sensitive wild man; McDowell, director Anderson and writer David Sherwin imbue him with an emotional honesty and intellectual depth rarely seen in films about youth.


TIME AFTER TIME
1979, Warner Bros., 112 min, USA, Dir: Nicholas Meyer

One of his most popular and engaging films finds Malcolm McDowell as Victorian author H.G. Wells, in pursuit of Jack the Ripper (David Warner), time-traveling to contemporary San Francisco and finding help and romance from shy modern girl Mary Steenburgen. A marvelously entertaining blend of sci-fi, literary history and modern pop culture from Nicholas Meyer, the director of STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN.


BLUE THUNDER
1983, Sony Repertory, 109 min, USA, Dir: John Badham

Déjà vu 1983! The government has unleashed its newest weapon: a heavily armed helicopter that can spy on civilians from 1,000 feet and incinerate entire city blocks. The only ones who can stop Big Brother (in the form of Malcolm McDowell’s fascist cop) from using it against us are Vietnam vet-turned-police chopper pilot Roy Scheider and his tech-savvy partner, Daniel Stern. Director John Badham's paranoid actioner flies high with stunning cinematography by John Alonzo and dazzling dogfights over downtown L.A.


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