DARK CITY (1950)
1950, Paramount, 98 min, USA, Dir: William Dieterle

The murder of a fellow grifter following a fixed poker game leads a small-time gambler (Charlton Heston, in his feature debut) to track down a psychopathic killer bent on revenge. The complex tale, ranging from Los Angeles to Las Vegas, is evocatively directed by William Dieterle (PORTRAIT OF JENNIE, THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME) and features film noir’s favorite throaty thrush, lovely Lizabeth Scott. Co-starring Viveca Lindfors, Dean Jagger, Don Defore, Ed Begley and Harry Morgan.

1948, Paramount, 86 min, USA, Dir: André de Toth

Enjoy an adult dose of SoCal suburban angst as Dick Powell’s by-the-book insurance man, dissatisfied with his dead-end job and humdrum wife (Jane Wyatt), indulges an extra-marital dalliance with tough-luck model Lizabeth Scott. Who will make him pay for his indiscretion? The thuggish private eye (creepy Raymond Burr) who has his own designs on Liz? Her jealous boyfriend, about to be sprung from prison? Or his own steel-spined spouse? Come see who survives the guilt-sodden affair, a remarkable and vastly undervalued noir masterpiece.

1947, Sony Repertory, 100 min, Dir: John Cromwell

Colonel Humphrey Bogart knows something’s fishy when his best friend, Sergeant Johnny Drake (William Prince), jumps off his train rather than continue on his way to receive a much-publicized Medal of Honor. Bogart follows his trail to Gulf City, only to find his pal burnt to a crisp on a morgue slab. Things can only go downhill from there. Before long, other bodies pile up, and Bogart does some fancy footwork to keep out of a murder frame. The twisted clues lead to Johnny’s bewitching sweetheart Cora (Lizabeth Scott), smooth casino operator Martinelli (Morris Carnovsky) and sadistic thug Krause (Marvin Miller). A passel of contradictory stories point to a number of guilty parties, and Bogart has to think fast to figure out who he can trust - or he may end up like his dead buddy.

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