BROKEN BLOSSOMS
1919, 90 min, USA, Dir: D.W. Griffith

Director D.W. Griffith’s big-budget follow-up to INTOLERANCE was this tale of a Chinese immigrant’s (Richard Barthelmess) love for an abused young girl (Lillian Gish).


LA BOHÈME
1926, Warner Bros., 105 min, USA, Dir: King Vidor

Sumptuously designed (costumes are by an uncredited Erté), King Vidor’s follow-up to THE BIG PARADE was this luminous silent romance, based on the Henri Murger book that also inspired the classic Puccini opera. In this tale of struggling artists in 1830 Paris, embroiderer Mimi (Lillian Gish) and playwright Rodolphe (John Gilbert) are next-door neighbors who grow closer after each is threatened with eviction – though her self-sacrifice and his tempestuous nature set the stage for tragedy. Gish’s final odyssey through the cobblestone streets of Paris’ Latin Quarter is one for the ages. With Edward Everett Horton.


THE WHALES OF AUGUST
1987, Alive Films, 90 min, USA, Dir: Lindsay Anderson

Bette Davis joins another screen legend, Lillian Gish, for this lovely tale of two sisters spending the summer, as they have for 60 years, on a picturesque island off the coast of Maine. Anderson displays a deep love for Hollywood's past, casting not only Davis and Gish but veterans Vincent Price, Harry Carey Jr., and Ann Sothern, who was nominated for an Oscar for her role. A profound meditation on aging, this is perhaps the best of Davis' later films, and won Lillian Gish the Best Actress award from the National Board of Review.


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