THE MAN WHO CHEATED HIMSELF
1951, 81 min, USA, Dir: Felix Feist

A veteran San Francisco homicide cop (Lee J. Cobb) spirals into a moral morass when his married socialite lover (Jane Wyatt, in a rare fatale role) “accidentally” bumps off her husband. Instead of playing it by the book (would that be noir?), he covers up the crime, only to have his younger brother (John Dall) - himself a fledgling homicide dick - start putting together the pieces. This James M. Cain-inspired thriller gets maximum impact out of its San Francisco locations, including a memorable climax at Fort Point.


OUR MAN FLINT
1966, 20th Century Fox, 107 min, Dir: Daniel Mann

Lean, mean loving machine Derek Flint (James Coburn) takes on the evil boys at GALAXY in a struggle for world domination and a good recipe for bouillabaisse. Essential Swinging ’60s equipment here: a cigarette lighter with 83 different functions. With Lee J. Cobb and Gila Golan, and a terrific, super-spy score by composer Jerry Goldsmith.


ON THE WATERFRONT
1954, Sony Repertory, 108 min, USA, Dir: Elia Kazan

Director Elia Kazan’s stunning adaptation of Budd Schulberg’s account of Hoboken dock-worker life stars Marlon Brando as a has-been fighter who falls in love with the sister (Eva Marie Saint) of the "stool pigeon" he set up. Rod Steiger delivers a wrenching performance as the older brother who helped betray Brando’s chances as a boxer, and Karl Malden is the tough, working-class priest who serves as Brando’s conscience. Featuring Lee J. Cobb in an Oscar nominated performance as Johnny Friendly.


Syndicate content