BULLFIGHTER AND THE LADY
1951, Paramount, 124 min, USA, Dir: Budd Boetticher

Beautiful, doom-laden story of a brash American (Robert Stack) entering the traditional world of Mexican toreros; Gilbert Roland is stunning as Stack’s older mentor. The first of Boetticher’s great bullfighting films. With Joy Page, Katy Jurado.


HIGH NOON
1952, Paramount, 85 min, USA, Dir: Fred Zinnemann

No movie hero ever walked taller than Gary Cooper in HIGH NOON. As Marshal Will Kane, he’s ready to turn in his badge and settle down with his new wife (Grace Kelly) until he learns a criminal is arriving on the noon train bent on revenge. When the locals turn a deaf ear to Kane’s pleas for help (even deputy Lloyd Bridges refuses), the lawman must face a gang of killers alone. This iconic Western, named by the AFI as one of the 100 greatest films of all time, won four Oscars, including a Best Actor award for Cooper and Best Song for “Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin’.” With Katy Jurado. Favorite film of former president Bill Clinton, who screened it a record 17 times at the White House.


PAT GARRETT AND BILLY THE KID
1973, Warner Bros., 122 min, USA, Dir: Sam Peckinpah

Director Sam Peckinpah’s take on the famous outlaw’s rise and fall is nothing less than magnificent - a sprawling, plaintive, achingly exquisite reflection on loss of all kinds. Billy (Kris Kristofferson) and his loose-knit gang (among them Bob Dylan, who also supplied the beautiful score) butt heads with cattle industry interests devouring the countryside, something that steers them onto a collision course with old comrade and new sheriff, Pat Garrett (James Coburn). Watch for the "Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door" sequence with Sheriff Baker (Slim Pickens) and his wife (Katy Jurado), one of the most heartbreakingly beautiful women in the history of Western cinema. With Harry Dean Stanton, R.G. Armstrong, Donnie Fritts, L.Q. Jones.


Syndicate content