LITTLE WOMEN (1933)
1933, Warner Bros., 115 min, USA, Dir: George Cukor

Katharine Hepburn stars in this Academy Award-winning adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel set in 1860s New England. As four sisters grow from girls to young adults during the hard times of the Civil War, the difficulties, tragedies and joys they experience tear at - but cannot break - the deep bonds of sisterhood and family in this timeless and heartwarming tale of growth and self-discovery.


ALICE ADAMS
1935, Warner Bros., 99 min, USA, Dir: George Stevens

George Stevens left the world of B-movie comedies for A-list prestige fare with this heartfelt adaptation of Booth Tarkington’s novel. Katharine Hepburn gives one of her most subtle performances as an ambitious young woman seeking to escape her small-town background; although the character is superficially unappealing, Hepburn and Stevens allow the viewer to empathize with her in all her complexity. Solid supporting work from Fred MacMurray is an additional asset in this impeccably mounted drama. Co-starring Hattie McDaniel (GONE WITH THE WIND), who nearly steals the film.


THE LION IN WINTER
1968, Rialto Pictures, 134 min, UK/USA, Dir: Anthony Harvey

At Christmas court in 1183, King Henry II (Peter O’Toole) argues with his estranged wife, Eleanor (Oscar winner Katharine Hepburn) over whether Prince John (Nigel Terry) or Richard the Lionheart (Anthony Hopkins in his film debut) shall inherit the throne. Complicating matters is King Philip II of France (Timothy Dalton, also his debut) who seeks his own fortune by demanding his half-sister Alais (Jane Merrow), currently Henry’s mistress, be betrothed to Richard. The most royal of the cycle of '60s films dealing with the history and palace intrigues of medieval England.


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