FAMILY PLOT
1976, Universal, 120 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s dazzling, masterful and overlooked final film follows a phony medium (Barbara Harris) and a dim-witted cab driver/out-of-work actor (Bruce Dern) who cross swords with a ruthless, duplicitous criminal couple (William Devane and Karen Black). Greed, kidnappings, jewel heists and car chases ensue.


DRIVE, HE SAID
1971, Sony Repertory, 90 min, USA, Dir: Jack Nicholson

Jack Nicholson’s first trip behind the camera as director is a subtle character study about basketball, college and Vietnam. It stands as one of the best sports-related movies ever made and captures the true feeling of the late ’60s/early ’70s college experience. William Tepper is a star basketball player with a drug-addled best friend (Michael Margotta) who is dodging the draft and a faculty-wife girlfriend (Karen Black) bent on giving him the boot. Bruce Dern's performance as the snide, take-no-prisoners coach is masterfully hard-nosed. With Robert Towne and Henry Jaglom in prime supporting roles, and cinematography by Bill Butler. "Nicholson deftly illustrates the background cynicism of big-time sports against the more obvious cynicism of college life." – Variety.


NO SUBTITLES NECESSARY: LASZLO & VILMOS
2008, Cinema Libre Studio, 86 min, USA, Dir: James Chressanthis

The New Hollywood cinema of the 1970s owes much of its look to a pair of Hungarian film school refugees, Laszlo Kovacs and Vilmos Zsigmond. This documentary by fellow cinematographer Chressanthis is a loving tribute to these two lifelong friends and master craftsmen, with interviews from such colleagues as Peter Bogdanovich, Richard Donner and Dennis Hopper and clips from classic films shot by Kovacs and Zsigmond, including EASY RIDER, THE DEER HUNTER and CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND.


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