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THE TRUTH (2019)
LA VERITÉ
2020, IFC Films, 106 min, France/Japan/Switzerland, Dir: Hirokazu Kore-eda

Fabienne (Catherine Deneuve) is an aging French movie star who, despite her momentary lapses in memory, remains a venerable force to be reckoned with. Upon the publication of her memoirs, her daughter Lumir (Juliette Binoche) returns to Paris from New York with her husband (Ethan Hawke) and their young daughter to commemorate its release. A sharp and funny battle of wits ensues between the mother-daughter duo, as Lumir takes issue with Fabienne's rose-colored version of the past. Reflected cleverly by Fabienne's latest role in a sci-fi drama, their strained relationship takes a poignant journey toward possible reconciliation. Charming, bold, and imbued with endless emotional insight, THE TRUTH offers a relatable look at human relationships, featuring exquisite performances from its all-star cast.


THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF BEING
1988, Saul Zaentz Co., 171 min, USA, Dir: Philip Kaufman

Director Philip Kaufman’s sublime adaptation of Milan Kundera’s almost unfilmable novel, with Daniel Day-Lewis in one of his finest performances as Tomas, a free-spirit Czech doctor torn between the love of vulnerable Tereza (Juliette Binoche), whom he marries, and worldly Sabina (Lena Olin), as all three are caught in the turmoil of the 1968 Soviet invasion. Jean-Claude Carrière collaborated with Kaufman on the masterfully balanced screenplay. “What is remarkable about THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF BEING … is not the sexual content itself but the way Kaufman has been able to use it as an avenue for a complex story, one of nostalgia, loss, idealism and romance.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago-Sun Times.


SUMMER HOURS
L’HEURE D’ÉTÉ
2008, IFC Films, 108 min, France, Dir: Olivier Assayas

Juliette Binoche stars in this haunting family drama from director Olivier Assayas, which follows three siblings as they grapple with the death of their mother (Edith Scob). Tasked with dispersing their mother’s valuable assets, Adrienne (Binoche) and her brothers, Frédéric (Charles Berling) and Jérémie (Jérémie Renier), begin to realize their deeply personal attachments to their inheritance, as their childhood memories flood back into focus only to fade once more. “In spite of its modest scale, tactful manner and potentially dowdy subject matter, [the film] is packed nearly to bursting with rich meaning and deep implication.” - A. O. Scott, The New York Times.


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