BILLY LIAR
1963, Rialto Pictures, 98 min, UK, Dir: John Schlesinger

Tom Courtenay is wonderful as the frustrated, imaginative young man prone to flights of fancy - which also lead him to lie about nearly everything, whether he feels he needs to or not. This gets him in hot water with his stern father and his two very different girlfriends, not to mention his undertaker bosses, though his fast wit make his ambitions as scriptwriter for a TV host seem almost plausible. But when finally confronted with an opportunity to leave home and go to London with free-spirited friend Julie Christie (in her stunning feature film debut), we’re left to wonder whether Billy’s Walter Mitty-ish dreams are models for the future or an escape from reality.


SHAMPOO
1975, Sony Repertory, 109 min, USA, Dir: Hal Ashby

Director Hal Ashby’s classic mid-’70s comedy is a harsh and funny time capsule stuffed full of great performances. Warren Beatty excels as an amorous hairdresser contending with sexual politics and his many romantic entanglements, from the wife (Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner Lee Grant) of his business adviser Jack Warden to Warden’s mistress (Julie Christie) and teenage daughter (Carrie Fisher, in her first role). The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Original Screenplay for Beatty and Robert Towne.


FAHRENHEIT 451
1966, Universal, 112 min, UK, Dir: François Truffaut

François Truffaut adapts the Ray Bradbury classic with his signature fresh spontaneity and visual ingenuity. Firefighter Guy Montag (Oskar Werner, JULES AND JIM) has the ugly duty of burning books in his dystopian, fearmongering society of the future. When he meets and falls in love with rebellious book hoarder Clarisse (Julie Christie) and is introduced to the brilliance of the confiscated material, Guy begins to question his world’s dictates and must choose to either safely comply or run away - which could bring lethal consequences.


Syndicate content