DEMON SEED
1977, Warner Bros., 94 min, USA, Dir: Donald Cammell

“Never was a woman violated so profanely. ... Never was a woman subjected to inhuman love like this. ... Never was a woman prepared for a more perverse destiny. ... Julie Christie carries the ‘Demon Seed.’ Fear for her.” Based on the Dean R. Koontz novel and directed by Donald Cammell (PERFORMANCE), this provocative, imaginative sci-fi thriller is even more relevant today than when it was originally released. Scientist Fritz Weaver’s supercomputer decides it wants to impregnate his wife, Julie Christie, with its artificially created DNA, in a sinister attempt to take over the world with its hybrid progeny! A terrifying cat-and-mouse game follows as Christie is trapped alone in the house with the omniscient computer. Cinematography is by Bill Butler (JAWS) and the music score was composed by Jerry Fielding (THE WILD BUNCH, STRAW DOGS). With memorable voice work by Robert Vaughn as Proteus IV.


HEAVEN CAN WAIT (1978)
2016, Paramount, 101 min, USA, Dir: Warren Beatty, Buck Henry

When quarterback Joe Pendleton (Warren Beatty) is mistakenly taken to heaven before his time, the powers-that-be send him back to Earth in the body of an eccentric millionaire. Julie Christie, Jack Warden and Charles Grodin co-star in this sweet and hilarious comedy that earned nine Academy Award nominations, including four for Beatty as writer, director, producer and actor.


BILLY LIAR
1963, Rialto Pictures, 98 min, UK, Dir: John Schlesinger

Tom Courtenay is wonderful as the frustrated, imaginative young man prone to flights of fancy - which also lead him to lie about nearly everything, whether he feels he needs to or not. This gets him in hot water with his stern father and his two very different girlfriends, not to mention his undertaker bosses, though his fast wit make his ambitions as scriptwriter for a TV host seem almost plausible. But when finally confronted with an opportunity to leave home and go to London with free-spirited friend Julie Christie (in her stunning feature film debut), we’re left to wonder whether Billy’s Walter Mitty-ish dreams are models for the future or an escape from reality.


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